Posts Tagged royalty-free full-length plays

Poster for staged reading of “Olga” in New York

Women History

Here’s the poster for the staged reading of my 10-minute play OLGA, which will be part of a festival of short plays about women in history in New York on Sunday, December 14.

The Olga in question is Olga Romanova, the first victim of the Moscow theatre seige in 2002. I have a full-length play about that event — 57 HOURS IN THE HOUSE OF CULTURE — which was staged in Roanoke in 2012 and has come oh-so-close to being staged at two other theatre since then. (Here’s a link to more about 57 HOURS.)

This 10-minute play is not a cutting, but a spin-off that focuses on one of those characters.

This festival is put on by the Mad & Merry Company, and will be at the IRT Theatre at 154 Christopher Street #3B in Manhattan (West Village, or thereabouts) on December 14. Showtime is 7 p.m. Admission is free, but $5 donation suggested.

I’m told that space is limited, so if you’re interested in going, please email madandmerrytheatreco@gmail.com to reserve a spot. Here’s some more on OLGA.

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“Klaus” to have staged reading in New York City in December

My full-length script that imagines an origin story for Santa Claus — KLAUS — will have a staged reading in New York on December 2, exact venue and such still TBA.

This is through the auspices of Gi60 — the annual “Gone in 60 Seconds” Festival of one-minute plays that takes place each summer in New York, with a counterpart in Great Britain. I’ve been fortunate to have had my short work done there for several years. Now, the Gi60 folks are using their “off-season” to feature longer scripts by some of the Gi60 writers.

KLAUS: How it all began
Where did Santa Claus come from? There is no particular origin myth, until now. This story begins in the 1740s with an eccentric German professor of what we now call physics. He invents time travel, and when he becomes the target of the wrath of a mob who wants to burn him as a witch, he uses it to escape. Involves science fiction, treason against the king, a love story, and some cooking. Cast: Seven – six male, one female.

This will be the second staged reading for KLAUS. The first was in 2012 in Roanoke, Virginia, through Hollins University.

Here’s video from that reading and also some other links:

* Background on the show
* Photos from first day of rehearsal
* Photos from second day of rehearsal
* Photos from third day of rehearsal
* Photos from the staged reading of “Klaus”

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Photos (and fan mail) from “The Other Side of Oz” in Montana

The cast of THE OTHER SIDE OF OZ.

The cast of THE OTHER SIDE OF OZ.


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My show THE OTHER SIDE OF OZ plays this weekend in Billings, Montana, produced by the Backyard Theatre, which, true to its name, really is in somebody’s back yard.

This is my seventh full-length script I’ve had produced. This isn’t a single story, but rather a collection of short Oz-related scenes using characters in the public domain. All that, and my list of previous full-length productions, is detailed in this previous post.

My version is probably what you’d expect of my work: We have Dorothy on the psychiatrist’s couch, we have the sheriff complaining about dogs, we have Munchkin insurance adjusters going over the damage to the house — mostly in five-minute scenes.

I have the show poster and some rehearsal photos below but first, allow me to share this — fan mail! Yes, two young members of the cast (one of them 9, not sure about the other, but about the same) took the time to send me thank-you notes:

Dear Dwayne
Thank you. The show is very fun! I get to be Munchkin One in The Wizard Arrives in Oz and The Witch of the East in Sensible Shoes, I am also the munchkin in Horse of a Different Color. I am sending you some photos my mom took, the last photo is my Young Witch of the East hair and make up. Thank you for writing such a fun and awesome play. I hope I get to work with you again.
Thanks


hello my name is ****** I just wanted to thank you for the script for the other side of oz I played the young witch of the west and a munchkin I really enjoyed it its an awesome script you did a great job writing it!

once again thank you

sincerely,

I’ve never gotten fan mail from cast members before!

Lots of photos below:

The show poster.

The show poster.

Glinda and Dorothy.

Glinda and Dorothy.

A Munchkin insurance adjuster.

A Munchkin insurance adjuster.

You know who this is! The tin man!

You know who this is! The tin man!

I do believe that's Toto in this scene!

I do believe that’s Toto in this scene!

The huckster professor and future wizard.

The huckster professor and future wizard.

William Shields, Seja Foster, Micah Hornsby and Ryland Nelson go over a map of Kansas with the professor (Trevor Bionich).

William Shields, Seja Foster, Micah Hornsby and Ryland Nelson go over a map of Kansas with the professor (Trevor Bionich).

Glinda.

Glinda.

Oh, now we have a bad witch, too! And Dorothy.

Oh, now we have a bad witch, too! And Dorothy.

Dorothy and crew go to the horse racing track.

Dorothy and crew go to the horse racing track.

The complete set of photos is here. And here’s what the Billings Gazette said.

Photos from the cast party here.

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I have two plays about Richard III; Shakespeare only had one

Portrait of Richard III of England, painted c. 1520 (approximate date from tree-rings on panel), after a lost original, for the Paston family, owned by the Society of Antiquaries, London, since 1828. From Wikipedia Commons.

Portrait of Richard III of England, painted c. 1520 (approximate date from tree-rings on panel), after a lost original, for the Paston family, owned by the Society of Antiquaries, London, since 1828. From Wikipedia Commons.

You can file this under “shameless self-promotion.”

The big news of the day, at least for some of us, is that announcement that the skeleton exhumed from under a car park in Leicester, Great Britain really is that of the infamous King Richard III, whose death at the Battle of Bosworth ended the War of the Roses in 1485 and gave rise to Shakespeare’s great play.

Shakespeare only had one play about Richard, though.

I have two!

Richard III has always been one of my favorite Shakespeare plays, and I have a sub-genre of Shakespearean riffs. My two attempts to improve on The Bard, or at least imitate him, are:

* “The Making of the King, 1483-1485,” a political thriller with pollsters and campaign operatives (and apologies to Theodore White’s great series of “The Making of the President” books.)

* “This Sun of York” is a newspaper drama, of sorts. Instead of a war for the crown, it envisions two branches of the same family fighting for control of the family newspaper, with Richard as the lawyer for the victorious Yorks. Except now, with the paper safely in Yorkist hands, he’s bored — and plots his way to the publisher’s office. I’m rather proud of the wordplay that turned “this son of York” into “this Sun of York.” I’m also rather pleased with this: Instead of poor George drowning in a butt of malmsey (a wine cask, of sorts), an ink barrel in the pressroom does the job just as well.

Neither has been produced. However, “The Making of the King” was a finalist in 2004 in the Peterson Playwriting Contest at Catawba College in North Carolina and two scenes from it were later workshopped in a public performance by Another Chicago Theatre in November 2004 in their “Last Play Standing” competition.

And might I add: Both are available royalty-free (as are all my unpublished scripts). I like to think both of them would be suitable for schools (or community theatres) who want to do Shakespeare, but might find the original too daunting. You can find a more detailed synopsis and cast requirements for each here. (Keep in mind most Shakespearean performances include lots of doubling and tripling; you can too.)

Interested? Inquire within!

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