Archive for category Reviews

Review of ‘Moon Over Manitoba’

New York playwright Doug DeVita has posted an wonderful review of my play MOON OVER MANITOBA on the New Play Exchange:

“Ah, the innocent ballsiness of youth! It stands the two teen girls in this high-stakes road trip in good stead, and gives us a sometimes charming, sometimes harrowing ride throughout. The relationship between the girls is particularly well-drawn, and draws us into their story effortlessly, leaving us rooting for them all the way. Tense and touching, this is a wonderful script.”

Here’s a previous review of the script.

MOON OVER MANITOBA
A play about immigration, with a cast of two teen-age girls. Veronica is a teenager from Canada, whose father’s job has taken the family to Texas. She’s homesick for Manitoba. She meets Isabella, who turns out to have arrived recently, and illegally, from Honduras after a harrowing trip from Central America. The two girls know no one else and strike up a tentative friendship. When Isabella’s cousin, with whom she’s living, is arrested by immigration agents, Isabella flees to Veronica’s house. Veronica impetuously decides they should run away to Canada, which Veronica is sure will accept Isabella. That’s Act 1. Act 2 is their trip north, which is full of danger and unexpected developments. Cast: Two teenage girls, one Latina.
* Semi-finalist, New American Voices Playwriting Festival, The Landing Theatre, Houston, 2020.

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Reviews of ‘The Ferryman’s Apprentice’

My 10-minute play THE FERRYMAN’S APPRENTICE popped up randomly as the featured script of the day on the New Play Exchange on May 27, which generated a whole bunch of nice reviews:

“ An eerie, haunting tale set in Greek mythology. For a ten-minute play, it sure packs an emotional punch.”
— Kate Danley

“ Dwayne Yancey bookends “The Ferryman’s Apprentice” with Greek mythology, but I was emotionally moved by its core: a story of grief, guilt, and the impossibilities that death brings. This 10-minute play also is about perspective and acceptance, the kind that people will never have while alive. And, oh, it’s bitter to realize that.”
— Steven G. Martin

“ Touching, haunting, and raw, this elegiac fable is a masterwork of the short play form. The only thing better than reading it would be to see it performed ”
— Doug DeVita

“ Having just recently been through the loss of my father, this play struck me deeply. But it did not hurt; in fact, the wisdom and comfort of the story is to realize that death is more than just the ending of one life, but the continuation in another way: memories, cherished moments, even unremarkable times spent together. Dwight Yancey uses the Greek myth of the River Styx and Charon the boatman and inspiring poetry to tell a universal tale of loss, regret, understanding, and love. ”
— Philip Middleton Williams

“Losing a parent is devastating. But to suffer that loss as a child can be soul crushing. And if you were culpable in their death? Unimaginable. Dwayne Yancey takes us to the River Styx in this ten-minute Greek tragedy packed with hubris, catharsis, and choral wailing that will undoubtedly haunt ”
— Greg Burdick

“I highly recommend reading this around with English accents! The raw elegance of the language almost requires it. Yancey provides a fresh take on Orpheus as a son bargains for passage to the Underworld to bring back his father. The dialogue is jaunty and the negotiations clever. The use of a choir enhances the classical feel of the proceedings. Most importantly, there’s so much love, regret, and forgiveness between father and son, the reader can easily envision the richness of their life together and the magnitude of its loss. There’s also a mythical inevitability that intensifies the suspense. Terrific piece!”
— Scott Sickles

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Review of ‘The Weird Sisters Go West’

Canadian playwright David Elendune has left this nice review of my one-act THE WEIRD SISTERS GO WEST on the New Play Exchange:

Clever… Funny… If Terry Pratchett wrote Blazing Saddles 2.

THE WEIRD SISTERS GO WEST
The three witches from Shakespeare’s Macbeth turn up in a western town and quickly bring order to the Old West, with a few complications along the way. Cast: Eight – four female, three male, one-non-gender.

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Reviews of ‘The Ferryman And The Thief’

Florida playwright, director and educator Greg Burdick has left this nice review of my 10-minute play THE FERRYMAN AND THE THIEF on the New Play Exchange:

Losing a parent is devastating. But to suffer that loss as a child can be soul crushing. And if you were culpable in their death? Unimaginable. Dwayne Yancey takes us to the River Styx in this ten-minute Greek tragedy packed with hubris, catharsis, and choral wailing that will undoubtedly haunt.

Playwright Scot Walker — not sure where he’s from — left this review:

” . . . this play elicits all the memories I had as a teen, wondering about the ancient gods, learning about Caron and Cerberus (who unfortunately is not in this play). All in all, Yancey gives us a moving and poignant play with, very Aesop like, a lesson for young people at the end: Your word is your bond. Nicely done.”

THE FERRYMAN AND THE THIEF
A boy accidentally kills his father on a hunting trip. He goes to the River Styx, sneaks aboard the ferry to the far shore. Once aboard, he picks the pockets of the dead, stealing the coins they have been given by loved ones for the final passage. He uses these to try to bribe the ferryman to let him cross to find his father and return him to the land of the living. The ferryman agrees, but on one condition, which goes badly for the boy. Cast: Six: One juvenile male, two adult males, three non-gender.

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Reviews of ‘Exchange of Gifts’

Here’s some of the press coverage and other feedback that my touring Christmas show “Exchange of Gifts” received.

“This play was so good with a great message and many laughs. I am sorry if you missed it . . . terrific play.”
— columnist Mary Beth Gutshall in The Recorder, about the Dec. 14 show in Monterey

“Wow! What a great job all the ladies did. We were very impressed. They knew their lines well and it was very funny! Merry Christmas.”
— Anonymous feedback sent to The Bower Center for the Arts about the Dec. 20 show in Bedford.

Finally, here’s the story that the Lynchburg News and Advance did Dec. 18 to advance the shows in Bedford and Lynchburg: Read the rest of this entry »

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Praise for The American Experiment’ from a New York theatre

This came in the form of a rejection notice, but a very happy one, from a New York theatre:

“We so appreciated its arresting theatrical premise, thoughtful character work, and head-on engagement with urgent contemporary crises.”

Ultimately, though, THE AMERICAN EXPERIMENT was deemed not the right fit for that particular company. It happens. But the company didn’t need to say anything, much less such nice words.

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Praise for ‘The Christmas Goat’ from a UK producer

The Ambassadors, a theatre company in London, included my 10-minute play THE CHRISTMAS GOAT as a staged reading in its December event at the New Wimbledon Theatre in London. Producer Graham Hill sends these kind words:

“So many people came up to me afterwards and commented on how much they’d enjoyed the piece and how funny and engaging your writing was. The thing I personally love about your writing is that you don’t approach ideas and themes from the obvious angle and I think this is what hooks the audience so quickly.”

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