Posts Tagged royalty-free plays

‘Blood Relatives’ in Seattle festival

I’ve now taken part in 14 quick turn-around play festival. The latest was through the Rainy Day Arts Collective in Seattle although in this new virtual reality, the writers, directors and actors were from all across North America. We gathered virtually on Friday, April 9. I drew these prompts: Who (a bride), What (a game), Where (someplace scary), When (a family reunion and Why (“you’re going to have choose, is it [blank] or me?”). My result: BLOOD RELATIVES, directed by Sally Miller of Roanoke and starring Kelsey Boulton of Seattle as a vampire and Stephanie Kamau of Olympia, Washington as the fiance marrying into a vampire family.

Awesome logo by Dana Hall
The skeptical Valerie (at left) with the vampire Anastasia (right)

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Video: ‘The Stanley Cup Goes Missing’

Last month I took part in a 48-hour play challenge through This Moment Productions in Chicago. Here’s the video of the show: ‘The Stanley Cup Goes Missing,” directed by Dane Rogers and starring Stephanie Reynolds (upper left), Marc Motiejunas (upper right) and Sarah Hoback (below).

Also, here’s the awesome logo designed by Dana Hall, one of the producers.

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‘The Stanley Cup Goes Missing’ produced in Chicago

I changed the title later.

Well, kind of in Chicago. On March 26-28 I took part in a 48-hour play festival sponsored by This Moment Productions, which is in Chicago, although the theatre had writers, directors and actors from 13 states and one Canadian province.

I drew “thriller/mystery” as my genre, then we were all instructed to use “did you enjoy yourself last night?” as our opening line and “I miss moments like this more than anything” as our closing line. We also had to construct a way to explain why all our characters were speaking virtually and encouraged to make use of all the whiz-bang technology available through the Steamyard platform, including the ability to do a TV-like “crawl.” I was assigned director Dane Rogers of Cincinnati and a cast of three — Sarah Hoback of Cincinnati, Stephanie Reynolds of Des Moines and Marc Motiejunas of London, Ontario. As soon as I heard the opening line, I immediately pictured a lawyer speaking to a client in jail. Surprise! Turns out Marc really is a lawyer — a prosecutor. What I came up with: THE STANLEY CUP GOES MISSING. More photos below:

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Logo for ‘Miss Mitchell’s Comet’

Powerstories Theatre in Tampa, Florida will present my full-length script MISS MITCHELL’S COMET as part of their virtual festival Voices of Truth in March. The theatre only produces plays that are based on true stories about women and girls. My play is based on the true story of Maria Mitchell, America’s first female astronomer — and the first North American of any gender to discover a comet (1847). The show airs virtually Friday, March 12 at 8 p.m., starring Katerina Yancey of Fincastle, Virginia and Scott Cooper of Waterloo, Ontario. Here’s the logo for the show, designed by Samantha Sylvester of Mississauga, Ontario. I highly and happily recommend her work. Earlier I posted this video interview I did with the theatre.

Logo designed by Samantha Sylvester

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Video: ‘The Unopened Valentine’ in Maryland

Sandy Spring Theatre Group in Maryland (suburban DC) presented a virtual festival of Valentine’s Day shows on Feb. 13. One of them was my play THE UNOPENED VALENTINE. It starred Sally Miller of Roanoke, Virginia and Ella Kennedy of Hamilton, Ontario. Sally also directed the piece. Here’s the full festival. Mine starts at 1:25, just after intermission.

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Review: ‘The Ferryman and The Thief’

A reviewer named Angie Loveday — don’t know any more — left this review of my 10-minute play THE FERRYMAN AND THE THIEF on the New Play Exchange:

“ Well-thought story involving the basis of Greek afterlife. It leaves a nice message about the fear of the known and unknown, helping accept death. Albeit a dark ending as the child must pay his dues, but very appropriate within the story. ”

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Photos: ‘Shakespeare’s Lost Christmas Play’ in Utah

Here are some photos from the dress rehearsal for SHAKESPEARE’S LOST CHRISTMAS PLAY at Eskdale High School in Millard County, Utah. First, the back story: Director Lois Faber had produced two scripts of mine a few years ago. In September, she contacted me out of the blue to say she was looking for a Christmas play for her class to perform. She’d come up short. It need to fit a specific number of students, with a specific gender mix, a specific length, and needed to be performed socially distanced. Oh, and it would be nice if it would address the pandemic. So I wrote a script to fit those specifications — except I changed the setting from the COVID-19 pandemic to the plague in Shakespeare’s day.

The cast included some musically-talented students so I wrote in some musical interludes.

More wonderful photos below:

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Photos from ‘Red Moon Rising in the East’ in Norfolk

Sergei talks about the first time he saw an airplane.

 

Little Theatre of Norfolk has produced my one-man play about the father of the Soviet space program as a virtual show. The theatre staged the show without an audience, filmed it, and has posted it online through the platform ShowTix4U. Here’s Brian Cebrian as Sergei Korolev. This marks the fifth production of the show — at the moment, it’s my most-produced full-length show.

Showing off the design for the N1 moon rocket.

Watching the launch of the first Sputnik.

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Video: Reading of ‘Freeda’s Fascination With Fire’

My newest full-length play is the comedy FREEDA’S FASCINATION WITH FIRE. On Oct. 17, I held a Zoom reading with an international cast (and a small audience that included former U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a big fan of live theatre).

FREEDA’S FASCINATION WITH FIRE
A teenage pyromaniac in Texas is sentenced to an unusual community service punishment: To serve as fire baton twirler for a high school that doesn’t have a football team but needs a halftime show. Comedy ensues. Cast: Eight – five female, three male.

The cast:

Stage directions: Charlie Boswell (Roanoke, Va.)
Freeda: Emily Solomon (Colorado Springs, Colorado)
Miss Battleaxe: Alyson Bates (Colorado Springs, Colorado)
Ramona: Martha Boswell (Roanoke, Va.)
Judge Hardhammer: Brian Otto (Waterloo, Ontario)
Cee Cee: Sally Miller (Roanoke, Virginia)
Dee Dee: Emily Bolyea-Kyere (Hamilton, Ontario)
Fast Eddie: Stephen Baltz (Christiansburg, Virginia)
Slowhand Sam: Mason Micevski (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Review of ‘God of a Dead Universe’

New York playwright Larry Rinkel has posted a nice review of my full-length play GOD OF A DEAD UNIVERSE on the New Play Exchange:

” Yancey’s themes are clear – the destructive effects of climate change, here applied in a parable-like manner to Mars rather than earth. And his characters are clear as well rather than being rounded – the intrepid investigative reporter, the courageous scientist imprisoned for speaking unpalatable truths, the pompous but corrupt empty suit of a president. But what makes the play work is its skillful fast pacing and well-written dialogue. A good choice for theaters looking for a cautionary tale on climate change.”

He also had nice things to say about the short play THE MATH LESSON, which began life as a stand-alone short but was later incorporated into one scene of GOD OF A DEAD UNIVERSE.

 

GOD OF A DEAD UNIVERSE
A dark look at the last days of life on Mars. The Martian civilization has mismanaged its resources and is now running out of water. The rival political factions appear to have come together to install a new government, one that has embarked on a massive canal project to bring water from the poles. A newspaper reporter covering the canal project notices a discrepancy, though, and he/she begins investigating. The reporter suspects embezzlement. When the reporter confronts the chancellor, the chancellor freely admits to siphoning off money, but not for personal use. Instead, it’s to build a giant underground library in which to store Martian artifacts. The chancellor confesses that the canal project is merely a diversion to keep people busy – there’s no way it will work. The planet will run out of water long before it’s completed, and the underground library is an attempt to save at least some remnant of Martian life in case other intelligent beings ever discover it. Cast: 12 or 13, all non-gender.

 

 

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