Archive for category Reviews

Reviews for ‘The Cellphones of the Dead’

Here are four reviews posted on the New Play Exchange about my short play THE CELLPHONES OF THE DEAD, based on a school shooting:

“I was there for the first performance (actually, I was in it), just days after the 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech. Based on actual circumstances, this short play retains its power and poignancy even a decade later. Highly recommended.”
— Kenley Smith


“I first encountered this play a month ago and was grateful to include it in a reading of gun reform plays I produced. I can only imagine the impact this heart-wrenching monologue play would have with a full production. A snapshot, one facet of the impact of gun violence. It has stayed with me since the moment I read it; it will stay with you, too. ”

— Jordan Elizabeth Henry

“Yancey’s unsettling images of a scene after a shooting, that time for a police officer to count and recount the dead, the sounds of ringing cellphones and the calls from love ones..it’s a heartbreaking read. As a fully-produced solo show, the officer’s narration of the crime scene that’s haunting his memory, with the victims of that memory strewn across the stage, will be a heart-wrenching experience for the audience. Highly recommended short play for your festival on gun control.”
— Asher Wyndham

“Effective and heartwrenching, Yancey takes one of the most chilling details from reports of gun violence (he cites a particular incident, I heard about it in another, which just goes to show how sadly commonplace such events have become) and brings it to life in a piece that speaks for itself … and for the victims of such murders and the helpers who come along and have to face the aftermath. Simple stage directions underline the tragedy of such events. Yancey’s words here are both a moment of silence for victims and a call to arms for we who remain.”
— Matthew Weaver

About the script: Read the rest of this entry »

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“This Rose Has Thorns” wins award in Australia

The company that produced my play THIS ROSE HAS THORNS in Melbourne, Australia in April 2018 has won an award for the show. BustCo — aka, the Burwood Student Theatre Company at Deakin University — won an Adjudicator’s Award from the Victorian Drama League, the theatre association for the state of Victoria. The award was given out on Dec. 1. It was the first time BustCo has entered the competition. I’m told that the talk at the table afterwards was “we’ve got to tell Dwayne!” So they messaged me while the banquet continued. It was 3:30 a.m. on the east coast of North America but I was up late writing so got the word right away. Congrats, mates! Here’s video of the moment the BustCo attendees found out they won. More photos below.

Director John Jennings, at left, and some of the cast and crew from THIS ROSE HAS THORNS. Photo by BustCo.

The award. Photo by Bianca Heard.

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“Extracted” praised for ‘precise comic sensibility’

OK, this is in the form of a rejection notice. But keep in mind that most theatres, in their rejection notices, never say anything specific at the work — they’re usually just form letters, which I don’t mind. But this one from a New York theatre was different:

“Thank you for sharing your play EXTRACTED with us at [name of theatre]. We quite enjoyed the play’s precise comic sensibility and symbolic meditation on contemporary America.” Then came “I’m afraid it’s not a perfect fit for [name of theatre] at this time.” Not a hit, but some nice words that the theatre didn’t have to say.

Here’s the synopsis of the show:

EXTRACTED

A dark allegorical tale about modern politics and immigration. An American truck driver sleeping in his cab at a truckstop in southern California is awoken by two teenage girls, Sam and Libby. He thinks they’re truckstop prostitutes and tries to run them away. Instead, the one explains that she has rescued her sister from drug gangs in Los Angeles and is trying to take her home to safety in New York. The rescued sister is our allegorical Statue of Liberty. In fact, she has not been rescued; she has been drugged against her will, for reciting — and practicing — the poem at the statue’s base: “give me your tired, your poor . . . ” As the roadtrip across North American unfolds, we see that the older sister is not, in fact, a protector and rescuer, but rather her kidnapper, who is trying to brainwash her. Along the way, the keep running into another truck driver, who is taking the same route across the country, and a mysterious woman. In the climactic scene, Sam has hired a tattoo artist to blot out “The New Colossus” poem that Libby has tattooed on her. Just then the two mystery figures burst in — revealing themselves to be special agents for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, who are mounting a hostage rescue and extraction to take Libby to safety in Canada. They are joined by a Mexican intelligence agent, as well, who they had previously met along the way at a truckstop. Cast: Eight — Five female (including who can pass for teens, and one Latina adult), three male.

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Review: My entry in Overnight Sensations called “the best”

The big finish. Photo by Dan Smith

OVERNIGHT SENSATIONS, the annual 24-hour play project sponsored by Mill Mountain Theatre and the Hollins University Playwrights’ Lab, isn’t a competition but my entry this year got a nice review from local journalist Dan Smith:

Here’s what Dan had to say about my piece in his review on the night’s performance:

“There were many notable moments and accomplishments, not the least of which was Dwayne Yancey’s fall-down funny “The Denmark County Barbershop Quartet Presents …,” wherein an oddball quartet gets by singing about disasters. This is, I think, the first musical I’ve seen in the 11 Overnight Sensations and the crew (Reilly Lincavicks, Michael Mansfield, Erica Musyt, J.P. Powell, Chris Shepard and Ally Thomas) carried if off beautifully. I thought it was the best of all the plays last night.”

MORE FROM OVERNIGHT SENSATIONS 2018:

* How the process unfolds

* Rehearsal photos

* Photos and videos from THE DENMARK COUNTY BARBERSHOP QUARTET PRESENTS . . .

* More photos by other photographers

* Lots more photos here.

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“Just Another Day At The Office” wins a prize

An unexpected award.

An unexpected surprise arrived in the mail recently: My one-act play JUST ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE won top honors at an April festival of staged readings in Middleburg, Virginia sponsored by Shakespeare In The Burg.

Here’s video of the actual reading.

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Praise for “The Face on Mars” in London

In May, Horatio Theatre in London, UK produced my short play THE FACE ON MARS as part of a three-day festival of short science fiction plays. Here’s a note from the producer:

“Courtney Larkin tackled the bottomless depths of Dwayne Yancey’s imaginative and sharp script, and made it into a clean, dry, and twisted piece of wonderful stagecraft. It was uncomfortably funny, and it perfectly mirrored many of the things we hate about the world around us. The twist, unexpected as it was, was sold to perfection by Lindsey Huebner and Martin Lomas. After watching them, I really want to know more about that martian civilisation, that society that disappeared millions of years before we even existed.”

The script was previously produced in Connecticut. No photos from London but do have some from Connecticut.

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Review: Shakespeare Oz likes “This Rose Has Thorns”

The con men con the constable. Photo by Duane Wheare.

The website Shakespeare Oz has a nice review of “This Rose Has Thorns,” which ran April 5-7 in Melbourne, Australia.

There’s also a Q&A with actor Sam Corr, who plays Toby.

More on THIS ROSE HAS THORNS:

* Photos from the show

* Meet the cast and crew

* Rehearsal photos

* Photos from first read-through

* New poster for THIS ROSE HAS THORNS

* First round of posters

* Cast list for the show

* Amazing audition poster

* First international production of a full-length script announced

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